The Yashica 35CC Review

Good day you awesome war torn camera geeks!

Over the past few months, and indeed over the years some of you have reached out to me here, on Facebook, Instagram, and YouTube asking me basically something that sounds like this:

“Sam I really want a Contax T2, or a Konica Hexar, or a Nikon 35ti, or a Ricoh GR1 but the prices on those cameras are insanely high. Can you recommend a low cost alternative that delivers the goods?”

Now if you’re one of those people who asked, or if you echo those same sentiments then I would ask you…why do you want those cameras?

For some, it’s most likely because those premium cameras are among the most wanted on the YouTube playlist. In fact, the YouTube reviews by young millennials might be the driving force to why these cameras have skyrocketed in price. Kendall Jenner was just a catalyst with the T2 but the YouTube reviews thereafter took the prices into the atmosphere!

Now for you guys who are really into photography, you may have wanted one of those premium cameras for street photography. By and large, the premiums like the T2, Hexar, 35ti and of course the Ricoh GR1 have a deservedly good reputation as street cameras.

But the insanity of the high prices on those cameras keeps the thinking man from jumping in. Can you really get comparable quality from cheaper cameras?

Today I have an alternative for you that I believe is an excellent choice, and at perhaps at 1/10th the price of most premiums.

And that camera is the Yashica 35CC. It is a camera I believe to be Yashica’s hidden gem.

INTRODUCTION

The Yashica 35CC/CCN is a compact, 35mm rangefinder with a 35mm f/1.8 Color-Yashinon fixed lens.

The camera has a shutter speed range of 8 seconds to 1/250 and a flash synch of 1/30th of a second. The camera runs on one 6 volt 544 or equivalent battery.

YOUTUBE VIDEO

For those who are interested in this camera, this video review may have the answers to your questions. It’s a pretty deep dive into this camera!

IMPRESSIONS OF THE ELECTRO 35CC AND IN USE

While I’ve used several Yashica Electro models over the years, the 35CC was a late addition to my collection and I got it around 2018-2019.

My first impression is that the camera is much smaller than more well known models like the Yashica Electro GS/GSN.

According to the Camera-Wiki, the Yashica Electro 35CC is “wrongly” thought by some to be part of the Yashica Electro family. However as I show on my YouTube video, you can’t blame people for “wrongly” thinking that when it actually says “Electro 35CC” on the top of the camera! 😀

But the thing that stands out right away and the thing that is indeed the star feature of the Electro 35CC/CCN. It is that bright 35mm f/1.8 lens!

Traditionally, rangefinders from this era have fixed lenses in the 40-45mm range. Think the Olympus SP, the Canonets, or even the aforementioned Yashica Electro GSN.

And even premium compacts like the Contax T2 has a 38mm f/2.8 lens. So the lens on the Electro 35CC at f/1.8 is a stop faster than the 2.8 on the Contax T2, Nikon 35ti, Leica Minilux, and marginally faster than the Konica Hexar’s 35mm f/2.

What does that extra speed buy you? The ability to shoot in lower light conditions and hopefully getting a good shot. And even though the 35mm focal length has never been known as a bokeh monster, the extra fast f/1.8 might help coax out that extra bit of bokeh.

What doesn’t it have that the premium compacts mentioned above does? It doesn’t have autofocus for one thing. It doesn’t have a Carl Zeiss lens or a Ricoh GR lens but without those brand labels, the prices can be kept low. That’s a positive thing!

IN USE

The Yashica Electro 35CC is small and compact and feels good in the hand. It’s a little on the thick side so it’s not exactly pocketable for the usual pant pockets.

The rangefinder patch on my copy is nice and contrasty making it easy to focus. There are dual focus tabs on the lens which is a nice touch.

The controls are sparse. The camera is basically aperture priority. You select the aperture via the markings on the lens and the camera selects the shutter speed. The shutter speed range is a whopping 8 seconds to 1/250th for the top speed.

The camera gives no indication of what speed it chooses. The only indication is a + or – for over or underexposure.

On my particular camera that indicator no longer works. I can’t see anything indicating over or underexposure. The battery check on my camera is also not working. However, that did not stop the camera from producing mostly well exposed images.

If you run out of batteries there is a default mechanical speed. Some sites say it’s 1/250th but others say it’s 1/30th. In my opinion, based on usage, it seems the default shutter speed without a battery is 1/30th.

SAMPLE PICS

All images below were taken with the Yashica Electro 35CC and Kentmere 400 film developed in Xtol.

Based on my own tests, I believe the 35mm f/1.8 Color-Yashinon DX lens to be excellent.

In the above images, I can see that the lens is really only held back by the film (Kentmere 400) and/or my developer Xtol.

At f/1.8 there is a touch of softness (as are most lenses wide open) but it’s actually sharper at f/1.8 than I expected so I’m perfectly fine with its performance.

From f/4 to f/11 you can expect excellent sharpness and good contrast, assuming the camera chooses a fast enough shutter speed.

PRICES, AVAILABILITY & WHERE TO BUY

The prices for the Yashica Electro 35CC are trending from $80-130 USD.

I’ve read that this camera is hard to find but I don’t think it’s that hard to find. I got mine from KEH in 2018 or 2019 for around $100.

In fact, while working on this article I saw one last week, again at KEH for $133 in EX condition.

It is true that you don’t see them too often from USA dealers. However they are plentiful on eBay, from sellers in Japan.

As mentioned before, I have bought many times from Japan without issues. However, you must do your research on the seller, as always, no matter what country it comes from.

BOTTOM LINE

The Yashica Electro 35CC is a hidden gem! It may not be as well known or as desirable as say a Contax T2 or Nikon 35ti, but especially for street photography I find the images it produces just as satisfying.

And the fact that you can find these cameras for about $100 USD on average, well, that adds incredible value and enjoyment to using this camera!

The Yashica Electro 35CC/CCN may never go down on its own as a true Camera Legend (but it might!), but there is no doubt that the Yashica Electro series as a whole are Camera Legends that have made memories for people for decades.

In my opinion, the Yashica Electro 35CC is one of the best that you can get from this series, even if Camera-Wiki doesn’t consider it part of the Electro family 😀

If you see one at the prices I mentioned, buy it! And tell ‘em Sam sent you 😎📸👍🏻

YouTube Shorts Playlist

Good morning you awesome camera geeks! Today for your Throwback Thursday I’m just sharing with you a YouTube “Shorts” playlist.

Now in case you don’t know, YouTube recently rolled out a feature called “Shorts” in which users can put out videos that are 60 seconds or less, in vertical format.

I’m not sure if YouTube ever mentioned this but it seems obvious that this was done to counter videos by rival Tik-Tok.

Anyway, I started using it for fun and also as a way to give a little spotlight to cameras and lenses I own or have owned, but have yet to fully review.

If you haven’t seen these already, the items spotlighted so far are: the Leica R8, Minolta TC-1, Canon 70-200mm f/2.8L which I referred to as my “most unused lens,” Topcon Super D, Canon Dream Lens and EOS RP, and my famous or “infamous” $20 dollar Vivitar PS-20 point and shoot and maybe others I don’t remember off the top of my head!

Why don’t just make full video reviews of these items? Well, I’d love to, and some are half done but time constraints from work and family prevents me from finishing these projects sooner. I don’t make any money on YouTube yet so I need to give priority to my real job 😍

Plus, now with a little YouTube experience, I can sense that while a camera like the Topcon Super D or Graflex Norita may appeal to a small cult, they will be largely ignored by my viewers until I have a larger subscription base so I’ll save them until they can be properly appreciated.

Nothing worse than putting a lot of time into videos that will get little views! But yes, I know it’s better to post something than nothing at all so I’ll keep trying 😎😍😎👍🏻

FUNNY PHOTO OF THE DAY

I love an app called Snapchat! The girls think I’m getting old because it’s an “old” app. Is time moving so fast that a five or six year old app is old?! All I can say is…I still love it! 😍❤️😍

Photo Of The Day: “High Rise” Nikon DF

Good morning you awesome and beautiful camera geeks! Well 2020 will go down as the year Covid-19 came into the world and left a path of death and destruction.

Therefore I hate to say that, by God’s good grace, I prospered during that year.

As many of you know, my other job besides Camera Legend is in health care where I work as a physical therapist.

This photo was shot with a Nikon DF and 50mm f/1.8 Special Edition Nikkor. It’s a dream camera I’ve wanted since its introduction in 2013.

Just like many of you, my first thoughts during the initial wave of the coronavirus pandemic in 2020 was that I wasn’t going to buy any more cameras and lenses.

I saw what the virus did to people and to the economy and it scared the heck out of me.

When I saw my first Covid-19 patients last year, I have to admit I was scared shitless! I seriously thought of quitting. But I didn’t.

The more patients I saw, the more I realized these people needed me. In those early days a COVID patient was almost like a leper. I remember that same attitude towards HIV patients.

So I took on more hours as my coworkers had to quarantine from contracting COVID. Some even quit and were enjoying life on unemployment.

It got to a point where I said you know what, if I’m going to die from this thing I might as well go out with a bang!

I am grateful and really very lucky to have not tested positive for COVID thus far 🙏🏻🙏🏻

So with the extra money I made I picked up a few of the cameras and lenses on my bucket list and the Nikon DF was one of them. It also helped that prices on high end cameras were unusually low at the start of the pandemic.

Anyway I’ll tell you guys more about my experiences with the DF in future articles and videos!

I know of the negative economic impact COVID has made on so many people so I am not writing this article to brag about getting a cool camera. In fact, my sensitivity to this point is why I’ve waited so long to reveal it to you.

And even though I feel guilty for treating myself, please remember that I did WORK for it! I went into those rooms with COVID patients while some took off, quit, or enjoyed that extra $600 in unemployment money.

Anyway the Nikon DF is a fantastic camera but there are some things that I didn’t like about it. But hey that’s a topic for another day! Stay safe, stay healthy. That virus is still raging even with the vaccines. Have a blessed day my fellow camera geeks! 😍📸👍🏻

Photo Of The Day: “Fourteen” 😍 Rolleiflex 2.8F

Good morning you awesome war torn camera geeks! Recently I found this photo and it’s quite timely because this week, the little baby in the photo is turning fourteen! I can hardly believe it!

This image was a self portrait taken in 2007 with a Rolleiflex 2.8F with the 80mm f/2.8 Planar lens. Film unrecorded but I’d bet it’s either Tri-X or T-Max. When it comes to film choices, I’m nothing if predictable 😍

I don’t think I’ve used a self timer before or since on a TLR!! Have you?

Friend, as you know there’s always a healthy dose of nostalgia on my pages and it’s not without reason. This weekend the twentieth anniversary of the September 11th 2001 attacks came to pass. Twenty years in the blink of an eye.

Same here with this photo. 2007 was a year that changed my life and yet every year it is seemingly passing by ever faster, becoming a fading memory. I’m not sure how other people deal with the passage of time but I’m just a sentimental fool I guess. My Dad was like that, I guess it runs in the family!

I cannot stop time but I can record it through photographs. I suggest you do the same because in the end memories are all we’ve got. Have a beautiful week good peeps! And thanks😍🙏🏻👍🏻

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Photo Of The Day: “Twenty Years Later”

Good morning you awesome and beautiful war torn camera geeks! Well even though I started on an upbeat note, today’s topic is anything but upbeat.

The Freedom Tower, 2019. Yashica Electro 35CC, Kentmere 400 developed in Xtol.

As we approach the twentieth anniversary of the September 11th 2001 terror attacks that changed America forever it is bittersweet to see how the world today, specifically Afghanistan, is seemingly back to its pre 9/11 state.

As a New Yorker, I remember the events of that day very well. I remember the sadness afterwards. I remember the unity of the country. And I remember the pledge to “Never Forget.” Sadly, it seems like a lot of people have forgotten and/or have already moved on.

Just like many of you, the events of last month, August 2021, caught me a little off guard. Looking at it now it’s clear that while certain events may have taken the US government off guard, the bigger picture is no surprise to them.

That “bigger picture” is having the Taliban back in power in Afghanistan.

Now I do not wish to make this a political column. If there is any blame, I would say all administrations, all the US presidents of the past twenty years are to blame.

You could blame George W. Bush for bringing us into Afghanistan by taking Osama Bin Laden’s bait. But then again, after your country has been attacked in such a dramatic fashion what else could he have done?

You could blame Barack Obama for doing pretty much nothing that I can remember with Afghanistan during his tenure. Oh wait, during his tenure he did get Osama Bin Laden so I gotta give him some credit for that.

You could blame Donald Trump for making a deal with the Taliban (supposedly we don’t deal with terrorists) in the first place and you could blame Joe Biden for not taking presidential leadership to change some of Trump’s plans when he got the data that the Taliban were making substantial gains.

You could also say that Afghanistan is, sadly, a war torn country in every sense of the word. A country with beautiful and tough people but with a very complex mix of religious and cultural influences that could never be overcome by the influences of another country. Russia tried for ten years. They failed. Now the USA has left after twenty years with really nothing to show for it.

What irks me is the notion given by the media, who ultimately got their information from the government that everything was going great in Afghanistan and thus the world felt safer for a while.

Today the same people who sheltered Al Quaeda in 2001, the Taliban, are back in power.

Apparently in their agreement with the US government, the Taliban pledged not to harbor terrorists. The problem is they have shown time and again that their word means almost nothing. Whether or not they keep their word remains to be seen.

On one hand maybe we should have stayed and reshaped the country for the better. On the other hand, Afghanistan is not our country to reshape. And for the US government, there is no oil, no treasures to be had. If there were I’d bet the plans would be different.

Anyway this is not the forum for politics so I’ll leave it at that but as you can see Afghanistan is complicated! It’s not an easy topic.

Oh by the way, the above photo was taken with a Yashica Electro 35CC and Kentmere 400 film.

What is your opinion? I’d love to hear it! Keep it civil though. As I said this is not the place for politics.

My Latest YouTube Shorts!

YouTube now has a feature called “Shorts” and it’s perfect for me because while I enjoy sharing with my fellow camera lovers, I don’t necessarily enjoy making long videos that nobody watches 🙂

I’ve done a few of them already and they are lots of fun! And perhaps they may lead to full length videos in the future, who knows. Anyway, today’s shorts features is a sort of “old Canon meets new Canon.” It’s the EOS RP with the vintage Canon 50mm f/0.95 Dream Lens. Check it out!

Photo Of The Day: “Hello Sunday” 😍

Just a quick photo to start your Sunday. This was shot with a Yashica 35CC. Film was Kentmere 400 and developed with Kodak Xtol.

The Yashica 35CC is a 35mm rangefinder from the 1970s and has an impressively fast 35mm f/1.8 lens as opposed to the 45mm f/1.7 lens on many Yashicas from that era.

A review is likely to follow yes but here’s the funny (and maybe sad) thing. This photo was shot two years ago in 2019 and I’m only posting it now! That’s how behind I am with everything 😩

Work, family, the 2020 and beyond COVID 19 pandemic, my scanner dying, concentrating on building the YouTube channel…all these factors contributed to me being behind.

Recently I heard an old song by Don Henley called “The Last Worthless Evening” and there’s a line in which he sang “There’s just so many summers babe and just so many springs” 😀

I said Samster you war torn sumbitch you ain’t getting no younger so you better get moving! Hopefully I’ll be here more frequently. Happy Sunday good peeps! 😍📸👍🏻

The 1985 Method For 35mm Film Beginners 😎

Good morning you awesome camera geeks! Over the years, I’ve catered to camera and photography lovers of every kind.

Perhaps because I’m a collector myself, I’ve written a lot for camera collectors. I’ve tried to do both film and digital reviews because I love both but there’s one group I’ve not done a lot for. That group are the humble beginners.

I actually did a video on YouTube a couple of years ago called “The Benefits Of A Cheap Camera” in which I talked about the Vivitar V3800n, a cheap and affordable 35mm slr and although I tried to give some useful advice in the video, I don’t think a lot of people liked or understood my lighthearted approach and humor 😀

So today I will try to be more gentle and serious (if that’s possible!) in my approach

YouTube Video

The bulk of my advice today will be on my YouTube video. The young film beginner today is more likely to watch a video rather than read an article. For the rest of this article I will concentrate more on things I didn’t touch on in the video.

People can be funny sometimes. I’m sure a some people might say “Ah he’s just pushing his video!”

And the funny thing is, if the video is on Camera Legend YouTube and this is the Camera Legend blog, shouldn’t I be doing that?! It would be unwise of me not to 😍

But as you’ll see, this article touches on a lot that’s not on the video so consider it an addendum to the video.

Big Beginner Mistake

As beginners we all make mistakes. Heck even when not a beginner we make mistakes! At least I do still today 😀

To me though one of the biggest mistakes I see the beginner in 35mm film photography make is the notion that they have to be an expert camera operator first.

It’s not the beginners fault really. It’s perhaps all the “super photographers” they read about or see on YouTube but it seems to me they feel the need to learn aperture, shutter speeds, lighting, flash, everything all at once!

And yes it IS important to learn those fundamentals of photography but the truth of the matter is mastering these things take time and lots of practice.

Obsessing about learning camera function so much can make you overlook perhaps the most important aspect of photography: the actual picture. Taking the picture. Learning to focus the lens. Learning to compose. Developing an eye for a good picture.

So you say Sam, if I don’t know how to operate the aperture and shutter speeds then how am I going to take good pictures?!

Fear not! Let me introduce to something I call “The 1985 Method” 😀

The 1985 Method

No this isn’t actually a “method” I came up with but it’s how I developed a love for photography.

Back in the 80s as a youngster starting out, I usually shot sight unseen. Before I really got into photography, the camera was just a way of capturing my family, my friends, my world.

All I did was shoot and shoot. I knew nothing about aperture or shutter speeds. I knew nothing about composition or the rules of photography. I learned by discovery. And that still shapes a lot of how I approach things today.

Circa 1986. A selfie of two wannabe rockstars 😂 Shot with a Minolta X-700 and 50mm f/1.7 MD lens. I knew nothing about aperture and shutter speeds but those early days of photography experimentation are the ones I cherish most.

The knowledge of light, aperture, shutter speeds, composition, that came later as I started buying books and magazines. You could say I started out photography the wrong way! Yet, some of those early photographs are the ones I cherish most.

It was photography in its purest form in my opinion before it became the “game.” A game of “you should do it this way or that way.” You should use this camera, buy this lens, etc, etc. I guess you could liken the experience to the innocence of a child before the realities of the world corrupts them.

As mentioned on these pages before, I dabbled in photography in the early 80s with my parents cameras with mixed results. It wasn’t until 1985 when Mom bought us a Minolta X-700 that I started getting (to me) great results, certainly better than I was getting previously. I’ve always considered the Minolta X-700 that I got in 1985 my first “serious” camera.

The Minolta X-700 was my first “serious” camera and served me well as my only SLR from 1985-1994 by giving me consistently well exposed images.

Even as a teen, I was getting roll after roll of consistently good results. As I got older, many of the photographers I met encouraged me to go back to all manual camera like the Pentax K1000, Nikon FM or Olympus OM-1. They told me I should do more “serious” photography. I did try those cameras and I loved them but I didn’t always get consistently good results like I got with my old Minolta.

This photo from 2009 is probably my last shot taken on my original X-700. The lens used is the 50mm f/1.7 Minolta MD lens and the film was Kodak T-Max 400 developed in T-Max Developer. Twelve years already?! My how time flies.

With time and a lot of practice, I started getting results as good or better than the Minolta. I found out why…

It was because I often used the X-700 in the green P or Program mode. In this mode, the camera figured out the exposures for me and it mostly got it right most of the time! The Minolta was doing most of the hard work for me!

I was getting good pictures consistently and that inspired me to continue doing photography. And I have the Minolta X-700 and its great Program mode to thank for it!

Doing It The “WrongWay!

You see it all the time. Many photographers recommending a beginner start out with an all manual camera such as the Pentax K1000 or Olympus OM-1. Heck I’m a big pusher of that “hardcore” method 😂

So it may be a surprise to hear me say that for the beginning 35mm film photographer today I am not recommending they start out with an all manual camera any more. Even though in this YouTube generation things are easier than ever, I now advocate the beginner to start with a little bit of automation.

If you’re a beginner at 35mm film photography, I recommend you get a camera with a Program mode like the Minolta X-700 and I want you to use it! In addition, your first camera should also have an aperture priority or manual mode. I’ll explain more later.

My dusty and war torn Minolta X-700 from 1985 with its legendary Program mode.

I’m not the first person to advocate using the Program mode and I won’t be the last. And although the old “hardcore” method of having the beginner start out with an all manual camera is still near and dear to my heart, I realize it is actually a little bit of a “cruel” thing to do to a beginner 😍

A True Story

As a good example, back in the late 1970s my parents had a good friend who was really into photography. He had the great cameras like the Canon F-1 and A-1.

He was especially fond of his multimode A-1 and always got these great shots. He was always showing us slides and projections of his work.

I think I’ve mentioned before that this family friend was probably more responsible than anyone else for my interest in photography, cameras and lenses!

Anyway seeing all his great work, my parents asked his advice on getting a camera. He helped them choose the Canon AT-1. That’s right folks. Not the AE-1 or AE-1 Program but the no frills, manual mode only AT-1.

Guess what? My parents knowing nothing about aperture and shutter speeds, never bothered to shoot with the camera. It was never used until it was stolen from our apartment in 1982.

To this day, I wonder why our dear family friend, God Bless his soul, I wonder why he would recommend this camera to them and not proactively try to help them use it?

But as I said that was then. Today, young beginners can find everything they need to know online!

And since I’m in a kinder “ask what I can do for you” mood I am not going to be cruel and have them start on an all manual camera the way our friend did to my parents 😍

That may change though! 😂 And yes, it will change once we get into medium and large format cameras where automation is much less available.

The World Has Changed For 35mm Film Beginners

The main reason though why I no longer recommended the all manual camera “hardcore” method is because many different dynamics have changed. But one factor above all is a game changer. I’ll explain…

Back in the late 80s and all throughout the 1990s until perhaps the mid 2000s, I had one distinct advantage that film photography beginners today don’t. And that is something we took for granted called the “One Hour Photo.”

One Hour Photo?

What is a one hour photo? There was a movie starring Robin Williams called “One Hour Photo” but that’s not what I’m talking about 😀

A few of my “one hour photo” packets. The one hour photo developers have all but disappeared in today’s world. I still have a ton of old photos that I haven’t scanned but I know it’s a treasure trove of memories.

I’m talking about the places that develop your film in about an hour. At its climax, they were everywhere in nearly every country. You remember, don’t you? Well old school photographers will remember it well but kids born after the year 2000 may have no clue.

Basically, before digital came around and shattered everything, film photography had developed to its highest point of convenience where in the USA stores like Costco, CVS, Walgreens, and even local camera shops and pharmacies offered to develop your color print films in about an hour or so. Many times it took longer than the advertised “hour” but you’d still get your prints back rather quickly.

Companies like Fujifilm and Konica often supplied the machines necessary to do this.

So if I were trying out a manual camera, I could theoretically finish the roll and get the results back the same day and I did so, often!

But as digital began to put a stranglehold on film in the mid 2000s, these one hour photo labs began to fold. Many were gone years earlier when they saw the writing on the wall.

Today, you would have to send your film to a dedicated lab. The usual time for you to get your results back is around two to three weeks for most labs. Costco stopped developing or sending out film for most of their stores but CVS and Walgreens will still send your film out for development. Sadly, a few years ago they began this bizarre policy of not returning your negatives so if you have them send out your film, the negatives are gone forever.

The disappearance of the one hour photo labs is perhaps the main reason I relearned to do my own black and white development. I couldn’t stand the wait!

For the budding beginner in 35mm film photography, it is unlikely that they would be developing their own photos and so they must wait.

Why Great Results Fast?

We live in a world where we want and usually get everything fast. I can’t just blame today’s kids for being impatient because I myself have been spoiled by the convenience of it all.

Before the internet, and even as recently as the late 1990s when there was some internet, you’d sometimes have to wait weeks for an order to arrive. Today, I get most of my online orders in two days! That’s a game changer and no one wants to go back.

But in the world of film photography, sadly 35mm film development (as far as the wait goes) has gone back to something worse than it was when it was at its best in the late 90s and early 2000s.

It is my feeling that waiting two to three weeks just to get back lousy results from that first roll of film will do nothing but curb the enthusiasm of all but the most determined beginner photographers.

So I recommend the beginner start out with the much maligned Program mode, get some good maybe even great results right away and get excited about 35mm film photography.

Yes you should know the Program mode is not foolproof. Most old cameras have center weighted metering that can be easily fooled by bright light sources. However I’m willing to bet that the Program mode is going to yield a better percentage of results than if one were going in blind or trying to remember what they read or saw in a tutorial.

Shoot in Program mode. At the same time watch some good YouTube tutorials, read a book and take notes. After a few rolls in Program mode, then start experimenting by gently going out of the Program mode.

Recommendations

In my video I recommend and do a mini review on three cameras; the Nikon FG, the Ricoh XRX 3PF, and the Minolta X-700.

All three I have used and they all have a Program mode as well as manual mode.

I went into a lot of detail in the video so for the sake of time, I’ll just leave the details there for those interested. I also make recommendations on what to get for your first lens and also recommendations for film.

The photos below are extra samples from the humble 50mm lenses that I recommend a beginner start with.

By “humble” I’m talking about the 50mm f/1.8 or f/2 from any manufacturer and 50mm f/1.7 from some manufacturers.

The first shot was scanned with an Epson flatbed in 2010. The other two were crude iPhone X scans so they may not show the true nature of the images.

My Epson flatbed has gone caput and I’m trying to decide whether to go with a mid level scanner or a high end one. In addition to devoting time to YouTube, this one of the reasons you haven’t seen my work here. I’d really hate to continue giving you guys low quality scans! Y’all deserve the best 😍

This shot from 2010 was taken with a Nikon F3HP and 50mm f/1.8 Series E Nikkor. I am a big advocate for the good old and cheap nifty fifty. Scanned with Epson flatbed scanner in 2010.
“Dark Horse” 😀 Circa 2010. Nikon FG, 50mm f/1.8 Series E Nikkor. Film unrecorded. Scanned using iPhone X.
This image was shot with the Ricoh XRX 3PF and 50mm f/2 Rikenon stopped down to roughly f/4-5.6 With the humble 50mm you could shoot wide open to blur the background or stop down mid aperture for more subtle bokeh such as this. Scanned with an iPhone X.

As mentioned this article is an addendum to the YouTube video. Most of what’s on the video is not here and most of what’s here is not on the video. I’m not pushing you to the video for the sake of views. If that were the case I’d be making videos like crazy but I’m not. Note how long this article already is! 😀👍🏻

I figure those interested will check it out and those who don’t won’t.

Another point I didn’t touch on enough in the video is that it doesn’t have to be Nikon, Ricoh, or Minolta. You could get a Pentax Super Program if you like Pentax or Canon AE-1 Program if you like Canon. Any camera with a Program mode and a manual mode will do!

The main point is to get a camera with a good Program mode to start getting good results right away.

No Autofocus!

I however am NOT recommending that the beginner gets an autofocus film slr for their first film camera at this time. If you start with an autofocus camera and autofocus lenses then in my opinion you’re probably better off shooting with a DSLR.

I want you to have the Program mode for automatic exposures because exposures are probably the trickiest part for a beginner to understand, but I’d still want you to learn the “art” or the craft by learning to focus and compose. Get great results, get excited, and the rest will come to you with time, practice, and experience!

Conclusion

I can’t believe it took me all that space and time to basically say: Start out in the Program mode, get good to great results, get pumped about photography and work your way through the rest! You’ll be more interested in learning the camera when you start getting good results! 😀

Anyway this was the most I could put in one article but in future articles and videos we’ll work our way out of the Program mode so that you can work the camera and feel like a “real” photographer even though the Program mode will deliver 80-90 percent of the time! 😎

What is your opinion? Do you agree? Disagree? How did you learn 35mm photography? Leave a comment I’d love to hear it! In the end though, it’s just one man’s view so take it with a grain of salt and have a great day folks! 😍📸👍🏻

Contax G1 & 16mm f/8 Hologon Impressions & Images

Good day you awesome and war torn camera geeks! If you have seen any of my YouTube videos you will hear me often say that the reason you don’t know what the next Camera Legend will be is because I don’t know and that is no truer than today!

In this posting I will give you my images and impressions on the Contax G1 and the legendary 16mm f/8 Carl Zeiss Hologon ultra-wide angle lens. But first a little bit of my experiences…

THE CONTAX G1

The Contax G1 is the original Contax G legend introduced by Kyocera in 1994. It is a high end rangefinder-styled (not a true rangefinder) autofocus, interchangeable lens camera. The camera is handsomely finished in titanium and oozed appeal from nearly all camera lovers for its luxurious looks as well as for the superb line up of Carl Zeiss lenses made for it.

The G1 was followed up in 1996 by the Contax G2 which improvements and refinements such as a higher top shutter speed. The G1’s top shutter speed is 1/2000 while the G2 is 1/6000 but the most noticeable difference between the two cameras is the improved autofocus performance of the G2.

MY EXPERIENCES WITH THE G1

I lusted for the Contax G1 the first time I saw it in the photography magazines in the 1990s but I did not get my first copy till 2005. As with most people, my first lens for it was the superb 45mm f/2 Planar. I used that combo for about a year and loved the results. However, as I do too often, I sold the outfit to buy other equipment. Don’t forget the mid 2000’s were an incredible time for digital camera development and I was bit hard by the digital bug then!

I eventually got another G1 and also a G2, and I got these when the tide was low and prices were super low on film bodies.

While the main complaint about the G1 seemed to be on its autofocus performance, I never really felt it was an issue for me. Yes, the G2 has better AF but I could live with the G1 mostly adequate autofocus and its smaller size. I mostly used the G1 with the 28mm f/2.8 Biogon and the 35mm f/2 Planar.

The 16mm Hologon was never a consideration really due to its price and rather restrictive specs. It really seemed like a specialty lens.

YouTube Video

For those of you who prefer a more dynamic experience here it is! As I’ve mentioned many times, I’m not a videographer but I’m trying to improve the video production as you’ll see. It’s still low budget, don’t get me wrong, but I’m trying! 😍

The “Mystery” Of The Hologon

The 16mm f/8 Hologon is no mystery really. It’s out there and every hardcore Contax G user knows about it.

Where it is a “mystery” is the fact that while it’s a lens Contax G users know, it’s also the lens that few G users own. At least in my circles!

None of the Contax G users that I know personally has one. And if you go online in the forums you can also decipher that not many G users there have them either.

Why? Perhaps the same reasons I had. As mentioned before, it is the most expensive G lens and it’s also got a very specific and restrictive specs. That is, it’s very wide at 16mm and it has a fixed aperture of f/8.

That slow fixed aperture is not only hard on night photography but as I learned in my YouTube video, it’s also restrictive for bright daylight. As a person used to fast lenses and low light, I found myself overexposing shots. Trying to master this lens I feel will help me become a better photographer!

I bet most hardcore Contax G users had these same thoughts: They probably said to themselves (like I did) hmmm, I sure would love to get my hands on the Hologon! Then reason sets in and they might have said…well it’s too expensive and/or what am I going to do with a 16mm f/8 lens?

The Contax G users I know as well as the ones online usually stick with the popular and affordable G lenses such as the 45mm f/2 Planar and if they want wide they usually go for either the 28mm f/2.8 or 21mm f/2.8 Biogon. Both faster and more affordable lenses. Plus all three lenses I mentioned are much more suitable to traditional street photography.

So why did I get this lens? Because I got it for an insane deal at half price!!

Yes once in a while you find a rare deal and if you see it, and you got the funds, don’t forget as I always say in my videos (which I got from Steve Winwood!) “While You See A Chance…Take it!” 😎👍🏻

Sample Pics On Film

Here are some samples from my first roll. The film was Tri-X 400 and the developer was X-Tol. Keep in mind that this was the first time I ever used this lens so these photos are not going to be the best Hologon pics ever! I also just finished another roll but knowing the way I work, it would take another month for me to complete the video if I added those pics in. Plus it would make the video too insanely long! I’ll do another post here with those pics 😎📸👍🏻

Samples On Digital

Here are some samples taken with a Sony A7s and adapter. Be careful to make sure you do not damage your camera should you want to try this as the protruding rear element of the Hologon may hit the sensor in some camera models. As always, do your research! For comparison, I’ve also included images from the iPhone X which is around 28mm at its widest.

Price & Availability

The Carl Zeiss 16mm f/8 Hologon is still relatively easy to find and the prices are trending from $1000-1400.

It is the most expensive lens in the Contax G line, the only G lens made in Germany and the showpiece of the Contax G lens system.

The prices are very much dependent on whether or not the lens comes with the finder and/or the 4x Gradation Filter. I found both necessary but at the very least get the finder if you plan to use it on film.

Bottom Line

What can I say? The 16mm f/8 Hologon is one of finest, most legendary lenses I’ve ever had the honor of using. I am a mere mortal. This lens is a Legend!

The 16mm Hologon is one of the few lenses that I really get excited about! Yet at the same time, it also proved to be one of the hardest lenses for me to master. Because of its wideness I had to change the way I think when it came to composing. I also had to learn how to deal with the fixed f/8 aperture.

This lens is not your every day lens! However after using it for the past few months I’ve come to appreciate even more what Contax and Carl Zeiss gave us in the 1990s and that is superb optics at the very highest levels.

If you like wide angles and think you can live with its limitations then I can recommend the Carl Zeiss 16mm f/8 Hologon as a Legend of a lens that you will cherish to have in your collection and better yet, as a lens you’ll really want to shoot!

Alternatives

If you can’t find the 16mm f/8 Hologon for a price you like, you are fortunate today to live in a world with many great alternatives! Here are some. Buying from these links help support this site and helps me to create more content for you. Thank you!

Voigtlander 15mm f/4.5 Wide Heliar
The Voigtlander 15mm f/4.5 is a spectacular ultra wide angle that I have personally used. Not only is it sharp but it is also marginally wider and a lot faster than the 16mm f/8 Hologon. You can get the lens in Leica M or Leica screwmount so there’s no need for mount coversion like the Hologon.

Voigtlander 12mm f/5.6 Ultra Wide Heliar

Going even wider is the 12mm f/5.6 Ultra Wide Heliar. I have not used this lens but have always lusted for it. Images I have seen are stunning.

Voightlander 10mm f/5.6 Hyper-Wide
If you are REALLY a wide angle freak the 10mm f/5.6 Hyper-Wide has your ticket! This might be my next wide angle!

Continue reading

Dad’s Last Roll Of Film

Happy Father’s Day to all you awesome dads out there!

What is this camera being profiled today? Well it’s the Pentax IQ Zoom 735 and it was my go to point and shoot camera in the mid 1990s. Nothing special about it. I just used it when the situation didn’t warrant a Konica Hexar or Contax T. I did remember though doing some cool double and maybe even multiple exposures with it, something a lot of my big automatic SLRs couldn’t do!

Anyway my Dad wasn’t a photography guy but I gave this to him and encouraged him to use it since he was always walking around NYC in his retirement.

He died in 2011 and there’s still a roll of film in the camera. Being the sentimental fool that I am I haven’t had the heart to take the film out for development so it’s sat in the camera for ten years!

Recently I’ve been thinking it’s time but just like a lot of people who were close to a loved one who passed away I’m reluctant to touch their stuff.

What would you do if this was your dad’s last roll of film? Would you develop it?

Anyway Dad taught me so much by his example how to be a loving parent. Happy Father’s Day to my dad and to all of you great dads out there! Keep doing your thing! 😎😍😎🙏🏻👍🏻

I Did It!! 😍

“What day is it? And in what month?” 😍

Happy June folks! Sorry this is not camera related but it’s much more important in the overall scheme of things!

Why haven’t you seen this before? Because I haven’t gotten my first COVID-19 vaccine till recently! 🥰

Not because I’m anti-vaccine, think covid is fake or believe in moon beams causing forest fires or anything like that. It’s because I went so long working in dirty nursing homes, seeing patients, co-workers knocked out by covid and yet I never got it! Believe me I’m not trying to brag. I’ve been very lucky, blessed or both but I never caught it. Never tested positive. Never had the antibodies. All this despite going to work with 3-4 hours of sleep. Not always the best diet, drinking soda, etc, etc. I do wear my ppes and wash my hands but I was not super anal about it either. Sometimes I forgot 😀

I figured hey I came this far and never caught the damned bug so maybe I shouldn’t take the vaccine and try to get the record for never catching COVID-19!

But recently my dear Mom said “What are you trying to do? Kick the bucket?” 😀 It’s something similar to what the doctor said to my late great Dad when he tried to avoid the doctor during a critical time when he was on oxygen for copd.

Anyway I realized I was playing Russian roulette with this so I decided to get it for my loved ones ❤️

I had my first dose three weeks ago and am scheduled for my second dose this week. So I won’t try to tell you what to do but if I could I’d say folks, whether you’re for the vaccine or not do it for “you and me and all of the people with nothing to do and nothing to prove” 🥰 That’s from a song for a friend!


Do it for the world, do it for the ones you love! And if you can’t be with the one you love, love the one you’re with!😍❤️😍

Have you gotten vaccinated? Will you or won’t you? What are your feelings on vaccinations in general? Are you afraid of the unknowns like becoming sterile or having mutant babies? Are vaccinations yet another way for the government to control you? Whatever your stance, I’d love to hear your opinions on this!


PS: I won’t be surprised if I catch COVID shortly after this. That’s the irony of life! Not that I’m wishing for it, believe me I’m not but I wouldn’t be surprised if it happens! 😎🙏🏻🙏🏻👍🏻